In August 2015, Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui trimmed a few leaves of red romaine lettuce and passed them to NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren. Each drizzled a few drops of dressing onto the precious produce, then popped it directly into their mouths.”That’s awesome, tastes good,” Lindgren said. The International Space Station (ISS) harvest was too scant for a proper space salad, especially since half the crop was sent back to Earth for scientific analysis, but the munchies marked a milestone in human spaceflight. It was the first time an orbiting crop was grown with NASA hardware and then eaten. (Though scientists suspect astronauts might have stolen a few bites from a previous sample.)We now know that space lettuce doesn’t just taste good. It’s also safe to eat and as nutritious as lettuce grown back on Earth, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.Lettuce RejoiceFrom 2014 to 2016, astronauts grew “Outredgeous” red…



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